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Four reasons “YouTube for the Enterprise” isn’t good enough

tibbr

tibbr is a social network for business.  But don’t call them Facebook for the Enterprise!  Businesses have different needs than consumers, which requires their social collaboration tools to be more than what Facebook can be.

Social video is exactly the same.

I admit it – I sometimes tell people we are like “YouTube for the Enterprise”. But that understates what we do. The truth is that YouTube-level capabilities aren’t enough for companies that are adopting video as a strategic communication and collaboration tool.

Here are four reasons YouTube for the Enterprise falls short:

1. Bandwidth

A YouTube video is easily viewed by 10,000 people at the same time because of the collective capacity of the Internet. A live webcast being viewed by 10,000 people within a company can take down the corporate network. That’s because businesses are by nature a homogenous bunch; it’s not unusual for almost everyone to need to see certain videos at the same time.

These differences require IT to optimize their infrastructure for video. Intelligent content routing and video network edge devices are two examples of technology that can dramatically reduce the volume of video bandwidth required to stream videos to all of these employees. By the way, this infrastructure can be in-house or in the Cloud – but it must be thoughtfully provisioned.

2. Security

A corporate video is often valuable (and sensitive) because of its proprietary content. Unlike YouTube, corporations need to address the paradox of making videos increasingly accessible to employees, while at the same time preventing unauthorized viewing by others.

IT needs to be able to treat video content with the same respect and discretion as other business-critical content, with corresponding levels of encryption, and at-rest security protocols.  It’s not required for all videos, but it needs to be able to be applied easily when needed.

3. Knowledge Management

On the Internet, YouTube is one of many independent options for content.  Successful enterprises integrate their content repositories to maximize knowledge transfer. Enterprise videos platforms can be surfaced within collaboration platforms like SharePoint, IBM Connections and Oracle WebCenter. Why ask employees to learn another system?

4. Curation

In a business setting, video has a purpose. While that doesn’t mean it needs to be overly controlled, organizations that curate and manage their video “channels” are more productive. Videos like executive webcasts and training channels need to be orchestrated and organized in a different way than “look what my cat did” videos.

“YouTube for the Enterprise” is a good starting point for enterprise video, but smart companies go beyond just that to fully leverage the power of video in their organizations.

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